Shocking Brain Injury (TBI) Statistics in Canada That Will Shock You…

Robbie Adams March 10th 2018

TBI Picture

TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is physical injury to brain tissue that temporarily or permanently impairs brain function. Diagnosis is suspected clinically and confirmed by imaging (primarily CT scans).


Brain injury is something we know about, but we don’t really think about until it’s too late. However, these brain injury statistics for Canada will shock you.

Every year in Canada and the United States, about 5+ million people suffer from traumatic brain injuries.

These brain injury statistics from Canada within the last 10-15 years are important to know in case this happens to you. Get the information you need to know before it’s too late.

Memory Loss

Did You Know?

Brain injury is one of the most dangerous injuries you can suffer. In Canada, it’s more common than spinal cord injury, breast cancer and HIV/AIDS and occurs at a higher rate than all of those combined.

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By The Numbers

Every year, there are at least 165,000 serious brain injuries reported in the country. That’s 452 people per day, and 1 person every 3 minutes. Someone is probably acquiring one right now as you read this.

For Canadians under 40, brain injury is the leading cause of death or disability. This is especially true for those who are more involved in rigorous activities or physical sports.

Sports injury head

  • An estimated 4.27 million Canadians aged 12 or older suffered an injury severe enough to limit their usual activities in 2009–2010. This represents 15% of the population, an increase from 13% in 2001.
  • Overall, falls were the leading cause of injury. About 63% of seniors and one-half of adolescents were injured in falls, as were 35% of working-age adults.
  • Young people aged 12 to 19 had the highest likelihood of injury. More than one-quarter (27%) of this age group suffered an injury, almost twice the proportion of adults (14%) and three times the proportion of seniors (9%).
  • Two out of three (66%) injuries among adolescents were linked to sports. Among working-age adults (20 to 64), sports and work were related to almost half (47%) of injuries. Over half (55%) of seniors’ injuries occurred while walking or doing household chores.

medical data

The leading causes of brain injury in Canada are as follows:

  • Motor vehicle accidents
  • Slip and falls
  • Bicycle accidents
  • Injuries in the workplace
  • Sports, physical activities
  • Medical conditions

Next week we will discuss the Shocking Brain Injury Statistics in the United States of America, symptoms of TBI and the “Road to Recovery”

Stay tuned!

Brain Injury infographic

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